Monday, June 10

9:25 am - 10:10 am

It is commonly observed that workplaces are automating and moving toward artificial intelligence and yet greater reliance on information technology. But what are the upshots of these developments? How can you build effective human-machine teams? How will this affect wages and workplace conditions? Which kinds of workers will be best to hire and how should you identify them? And what are the broader social ramifications of this evolution?

In this session you will learn:

  • How to think about automation and wages
  • How to better think about worker training and retraining
  • How to better spot talent for this new era to come

Tyler Cowen

Economics Professor, Author, Stubborn Attachments and Average Is Over
George Mason University

About Tyler Cowen

Tyler Cowen shows the economic, financial, and demographic forces which will determine the winners and losers of the next decade in fields as different as healthcare, education, energy, and global markets. He offers compelling analyses of the future of the Eurozone, Medicare and Medicaid, the American financial system, and many more, demonstrating in every case who will come out on top and why.

His most recent book, Stubborn Attachments: A Vision for a Society of Free, Prosperous, and Responsible Individuals. Cowen argues that our reason and common sense can help free us of the faulty ideas that hold us back as people and as a society. Stubborn Attachments, at its heart, makes the contemporary moral case for economic growth and delivers a great dose of inspiration and optimism about our future possibilities.

Tyler’s predictions flow from the vision laid out in his bestselling book, The Great Stagnation: How America Ate All the Low-Hanging Fruit of Modern History, Got Sick, and Will (Eventually) Feel Better. He discusses the widening gap between rich and poor in Average Is Over: Powering America Beyond the Age of the Great Stagnation. In his book, The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream, Tyler argues that Americans today have broken away from the willingness to move, take risks and adapt to change. A tradition that has created a dynamic economy and of innovation.

Tyler Cowen is the Holbert C. Harris Professor of Economics at George Mason University. He is the winner of the fourth annual Foundation for Economic Education’s 2017 Leonard E. Read Distinguished Alumni AwardForeign Policy named him one of 2011’s Top 100 Global Thinkers, and a survey by The Economist placed him among the most influential economists of the decade. He is a regular contributor to Bloomberg View. He has written for The New York TimesThe Wall Street JournalThe Washington Post, and others. His blog, Marginal Revolution, was named the best economics blog on the web by The Wall Street Journal and is one of TIME. Tyler’s other books include Discover Your Inner Economist, a treatment of behavioral economics, and An Economist Gets Lunch: New Rules for Everyday Foodies.